The Wolves (8th & 9th)

8 9 The Wolves The Sage School
Sage School Bands Wolves Daily Schedule

Daily Schedule

Below is a copy of our weekly schedule. 8/9 students work on building their math, literacy & writing, and Spanish skills in two groups (or sections) in the morning, as well as taking some time to meet as an 8/9...READ MORE

Curriculum Chart

Because we have a two-grade band (8th and 9th grade) and have the good fortune to teach our students for two consecutive years, we focus on a distinct Human Ecology curriculum in each year of this two-year cycle. One year...READ MORE

Faculty

Teachers of “The Wolves” seek to emulate the best that we see in our group of students—to be energetic, to be playfully productive, to be curious about the world around us, and above tall to work together as a team....READ MORE

Band Parents

The idea and implementation of Band Parents has been a work in progress at Sage for several years. Band parents are intended to be a resource for new parents, other band parents, and another friendly face in the crowd. They...READ MORE

Student Work

This page features the current and just-completed projects going on in the 8/9 band. Our December 2019 project is a dog hybrid poster or model. Please see the photo (above) of a former 9th grade student presenting her hybrid dog...READ MORE

Field Studies Overview

Each year, students spend between 20 and 25 days “In the Field” in what we call Field Study. These experiences serve many roles: to ground the year academically, to immerse the students in special areas of focus, and to build...READ MORE

The Social Animal

Students in the 8th & 9th grade band are known as the “Social Animals” and are represented in our school culture by the wolf, an iconic figure of the inter-mountain West, and like wolves, tend to run in packs and play hard. The 8/9 band is the fulcrum of our program as years three and four out of seven, and students are in the heart of adolescence.

8/9 students are intensely interested in their peer group and are marked by a desire to assert their independence and individuality. They are no longer children but not yet adults, a space of confusion as well as opportunity, as students begin in earnest to explore and shape who they want to be when they enter society as full (adult) members.

Developmentally, the chief preoccupation of 8th and 9th graders is relationships; they are defining and re-defining their self-identity in relation to other adolescents, to their families, teachers, and coaches, to their home and regional environment, and to themselves. We see them asking the questions: Who am I? and What will my role and impact be both in society and in the landscape? To meet our students at this stage, we have designed a two-year curriculum that is all about relationships—one year focuses on human relationships to the natural world, and one year focuses on human relationships to one another and how those are defined, organized, and regulated.